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Full text of "Nasturtium"

1968 YEARBOOK ISSUE 
WITH REPORTS FOR 1967 

SPECIAL INTERIM YEARBOOK ISSUE 

As most of our members know, our 1967 Yearbook contained 
reports for 1965 and 1966. We had planned to continue making 
the MHS Yearbook a biennial publication and thus save con- 
siderable expense. However, the availability of the relatively 
inexpensive NASTURTIUM and a desire to inform members 
of the Society about its business and activities have caused the 
trustees and staff to publish this condensed Yearbook issue of 
NASTURTIUM as a basic reference for use until the publication 
of a 1969 Yearbook. Some of the usual Yearbook material 
which does not appear in this issue will appear in 1969. 

The 1967 flower show awards are listed in NASTURTIUM, 
May 1968; the 1967 special medal citations in HORTICULTURE, 
July 1968; and the 1967 garden award citations in NASTUR- 
TIUM, April and May 1968. 

The following includes excerpts of reports made by MHS 
officers at the Society's Annual Meeting on May 6, 1968. 

// PRESIDENT'S REPORT 1967 

The Spring Show was the first to be held at Suffolk Downs. 
This brought about complications which, combined with bad 
weather, resulted in a loss of $43,000. It was a good show 
with many innovations but it is obvious that the Society cannot 
sustain such a loss every year. While technically it is not part 
of the 1967 report, I am pleased to announce that the Spring 
Show in March 1968 resulted in a profit. 

HORTICULTURE subscriptions grew substantially during 
1966. This was obtained by large expenditures for promotion. 
Asa result HORTICULTURE during 1967 operated at a sub- 
stantial loss. Nevertheless, during the first quarter of 1968 it 
appears we may be solving our financial problems. 

I want to thank Mr. Lees and the members of his staff 
for their contribution to the Society. They are a particularly 
devoted group and often work long hours at crucial times It 
is our hope to be able to reward them better and to set up re- 
tirement and other benefit programs. 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

HORTICULTURAL HALL 

300 MASS. AVE.. BOSTON 02115 

Telephone 536-9280 

We are concerned about Horticultural Hall and its future. 
The removal of the theater building adjacent to the Hall em- 
phasizes the need to make specific plans. The Society would 
be grateful for capital gifts not only for building plans but 
also for increasing endowment funds. 

The need for the Society's services continue to grow in the 
urban community which gives increasing emphasis to environ- 
ment. Service is supplied through the knowledge and talents 
of the staff. Schools, neighborhood improvement and restora- 
tion groups, professional organizations and those working with 
the elderly, the mentally retarded and with children draw upon 
the Society for information and help. Fev r staff members 
presented 22 lectures in the name of the Society and the num 
ber of conferences involved in service to the community is 
uncountable. 

The Spring Show demonstrates the environmental concept 
of gardens and fine plants. It owes much of its success to the 
volunteer workers who give countless hours and the profession- 
al horticulturists who take part. Their sense of perfection is 
unique. 

Oliver F. Ames, Acting President 

HORTICULTURE MAGAZINE REPORT 1967 

In 1967 our expenses for HORTICULTURE were appi 
mately $815,000 and our income was S592.000, resulting in 
a loss of about S222,000. It was a very disheartenm 
However, for the first three months of 1968, HORTICULTURE 
reveals a small net profit per copy sold 

We have increased our circulation from 82,000 in 1965 to 
1 15,000 in 1967. The subscription price increased from S4 
to $5. Advertising rates increased 15% starting in January 
1968. We initiated a monthly accrual accounting 
which enables us to compare income and expense pi 
copy b.r 

In order to hold, and if p improve our present i 

culation we nding S160.000 for mail promotion. Our 



rate of renewal is being maintained at 65% which is above 
average for the industry. If we can continue at our present 
rate HORTICULTURE will end 1968 in the black. 

John O. Stubbs, Vice President 

TREASURER'S REPORT 1967 

The Society experienced a loss from operations during 
1967 of $351,475, down from $496,217 in 1966. The loss 
from HORTICULTURE was 63% of the total deficit. The 
Spring Show loss of $43,270 compared to a profit of $576 
in 1966. 

This loss was charged to the show insurance fund, and will 
be replaced by applying 50% of the profits from future shows 
until the fund once more reaches its maximum balance of 
$50,000. I am pleased that the 1968 Spring Show income 
was $221,267 vs. expenses of $198,764. This leaves a net 
income over expenditures of $22,503 of which 50% will be 
applied to the show insurance fund. 

In 1967 as in the past it was necessary to sell securities 
from the endowment fund to cover losses. The value of the 
fund as of December 31, 1967, was $1,519,872. 

Frederick S. Moseley, III, Treasurer 

Any member of the Society wishing to receive an audited statement, 
may obtain one by_ writing to the Treasurer, Horticultural Hall. 

MEMBERSHIP REPORT 1967 

It is impossible to give a comparative report on member- 
ship because of changes made in 1967. The first established 
a membership year beginning June 1 . This reduced confu- 
sion between a membership in the Society and a subscrip- 
tion to HORTICULTURE and simplified accounting and 
renewal methods. 

An invitation program to acquire new members was 
started. Any member may sign a membership invitation. Of 
a test group, a 20% return was realized. The key to such a 
program is members who contribute lists and time signing 
invitations. 

Mrs. Charles F. Hovey, Membership Chairman 

LIBRARY REPORT 1967 

New policies have been established covering nursery catalogs, 
periodicals, value and age of books to be loaned and reproduc- 
tion of library materials. A review of insurance on the collec- 
tion resulted in more extensive coverage. The Library Com- 
mittee arranged an exhibition, Six Centuries of Flower Prints, 
from the Society's collection. 



Our rare book collection is world famous. It has increased 
in value phenomenally since the floods in Florence which 
skyrocketed prices. Many of our books are deteriorating. They 
need special care or duplication. Some of them are no longer 
found on the market. The money available annually for the 
purchase of books, periodicals and prints as well as for binding 
and repair is $1900. In 1870, $1000 was spent on books alone. 

We welcome gifts and bequests to the library to properly 
maintain our position as the keeper of the most important 
collection of horticultural books in the world. 

Mrs. G. Kennard Wakefield, Library Chairman 



EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S REPORT 1967 

1967 was a year of inauguration. In addition to community 
services, several projects were initiated. In September we 
launched NASTURTIUM, a little monthly paper intended to 
establish better communication between Horticultural Hall 
and every member of the society. Not only has the response 
to programs increased but we have experienced heightened 
expression of interest in all things having to do with the 
Society. NASTURTIUM replaced several irregular mailings 
and has the advantage of being easily recognized. 

A significant step was taken in 1967 when a new Program 
Committee was established. This committee has been respon- 
sible for the Members' Mondays and the Five O'Clocks, two 
series which have become very popular. Members participate 
in discussions and become acquainted with each other. Other 
1967 programs have been workshops on greenhouse gardening, 
growing ivy on frames, bonsai, hardwood propagation, horti- 
cultural publicity and garden design. 

One noteworthy accomplishment was the move of the Fall 
Show into tents on Boston Common. This revived a custom of 
more than a century ago. The comprehensive yet simple 
schedule brought more excellent, small-scale exhibits than 
have been staged in recent years. Admission was reduced to 50«i 
and a larger audience attended (7051 compared to 3474 in 
Horticultural Hall). Trustees, exhibitors and staff agree that 
the show was a success and should be repeated. 

In addition to educational, community and member services, 
there is the business of running the Society. It is complicated 
because of the variety of skills used and attention paid to such 
divergent details as designing and staging a Spring Show and 
also determining why Mrs. Jones in Oshkosh is getting two 
copies of HORTICULTURE each month. Ours is a small staff 
but its enthusiasm for and dedication to the Society are large; 
for this I give thanks. 

Carlton B. Lees, Executive Director 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 1968-1969 



Oliver F. Ames, Acting President 
John 0. Stubbs, Vice President 
Frederick S. Moseley, III, Treasurer 
Carlton B. Lees, Secretary 

TRUSTEES 

Allen M. Hixon 1969 

George Putnam (Asst. Treas.) 1969 

C. Roy Boutard 1969 

Edmund V. Mezitt 1969 

Mrs. G. Kennard Wakefield 1969 

Russell B.Clark 1970 

Robert N. Elwell 1970 

Mrs. Charles F. Hovey 1970 

Mrs. Edwin S. Webster 1970 

Dr. Donald Wyman 1970 

Mrs. John M. Hall 1971 

Milford R. Lawrence 1971 

Vincent N. Merrill 1971 

Miss Helen C. Moseley 1971 

Dr. John A. Naegele 1971 

HONORARY TRUSTEES 

Albert C. Burrage 
Seth L. Kelsey 
Harold D. Stevenson 
Mrs. Rogert S. Warner 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Oliver F. Ames, Chairman 
Frederick S. Moseley, III 
George Putnam 
John O. Stubbs 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Oliver F. Ames, Chairman 
Frederick S. Moseley, III 
John 0. Stubbs 

BUDGET COMMITTEE 

Oliver F. Ames, Chairman 
Frederick S. Moseley, III 
George Putnam 
John O. Stubbs 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

George Putnam, Chairman 1969 
Mrs. G. Kennard Wakefield 1969 
Russell B.Clark 1970 
Dr. Donald Wyman 1970 
Mrs. John M. Hall 1971 
Dr. John A. Naegele 1971 

MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE 

Russell B. Clark, Chairman 
Robert N. Elwell 
Miss Helen C. Moseley 

LIBRARY COMMITTEE 

Mrs. G. Kennard Wakefield, Chairman 
C. Roy Boutard 
Gordon W. Dillon 
Mrs. Thorvald S. Ross 
Dr. Donald Wyman 

LECTURE & PUBLICATIONS 
COMMITTEE 

John O. Stubbs, Chairman 

Mrs. John M. Hall, Co-Chairman 

Vincent N. Merrill 

COMMITTEE ON BUILDING 

Oliver F. Ames, Chairman 
Vincent N. Merrill 
George Putnam 



GARDENS COMMITTEE 

Mrs. G. Kennard Wakefield, Chairman 
Russell B. Clark 
Milford R. Lawrence 
Vincent N. Merrill 
Miss Helen C. Moseley 

SPECIAL MEDALS COMMITTEE 

Dr. Donald Wyman, Chairman 
C. Roy Boutard 
Allen W. Hixon 
Vincent N. Merrill 
George Putnam 

COMMITTEE ON PRIZES 

Allen W. Hixon, ^Chairman 

Dr. Donald Wyman, Co-Chairman 

Roger Coggeshall 

John J. Hurley 

John L. Wacker 

COMMITTEE ON CHILDREN'S 
GARDEN EXHIBITIONS 

Dr. John A. Naegele, Chairman 
Mrs. Cyrus Brewer 
Herbert C. Fordham 

ALBERT C. BURRAGE GOLD 
VASE COMMITTEE 

Vincent N. Merrill, Chairman 
Russell B. Clark 
Allen W. Hixon 
George Putnam 
Dr. Donald Wyman 

EXHIBITIONS COMMITTEE 

George Putnam, Chairman 
Mrs. Charles F. Batchelder 
Vincent N Merrill 
Edmund V. Mi 
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STAFF OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Carlton B. Lees, Executive Director 
Jay Stinson, Assistant Director 
Jean Landron, Secretary 
Bette Levine, Show Secretary 
Diane Daugaweet, Receptionist 
Manuel Costa, Stock Control 
Lorraine M. Cantalupo, Publicity 

LIBRARY 

Muriel C. Crossman, Librarian 

Annetta Castle, Circulation 

Edith Stone, Cataloging 

Ann R. Hoffman, Book Sales 

Susan Bates, Acquisitions 

Marion Bell, Indexer 

Henry G. Wendler, Garden Information 

BUSINESS OFFICE 

Myron Bates, Comptroller 
Marion Costa, Bookkeeper 
Linda Parsons, Assistant Bookkeeper 



HORTICULTURE 

Edwin F. Steffek, Editor 
Laura R. Hatton, Assistant Editor 
Faith Kaltenbach, Editorial Assistant 
Sally Clarke, Secretary 

Arthur B. Pausch, Circulation Manager 
Lillian Misner, Secretary 
Lo u i se B o rd ea u , Subscrip tion Clerk 
Agnes Gallagher, Subscription Clerk 

Arthur C. King, Advertising Manager 
Patricia A. Salvatore, Production Manager 

MEMBERSHIP 

Mary C. Rochefort, Membership Secretary 
Karen Hicks, Assistant 

BUILDING & MAINTENANCE 

C. Hooper Jackson, Superintendent 
Elmer McPhee